What's considered scientifically possible is largely defined by the materialist paradigm, which ignores an ever growing body of conflicting evidence. Beyond this paradigm, some researchers are already expanding the possible, opening us to promising horizons of discovery.

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300+ Scientists, Professors, Doctors and Thought Leaders

Thinker of the Month

Marilyn Monk, Emeritus Professor of Molecular Embryology, University College London, Formerly Honorary Professor, University of Melbourne and Adjunct Professor, Monash University, Australia

Bio, Books, Papers, Videos


Previous Thinkers: Harald Walach, Marjorie Woollacott, Rupert Sheldrake, Larry Dossey, J. Kim Penberthy, Pim van Lommel.
For more see: Who's Who in Open Science

Recently, there has been much debate about consciousness in animals – even in plants – and I have observed in my research, and in my love for all creatures on this earth, that all life is aware and responsive to surroundings.

– Marilyn Monk

The Galileo Commission

A project of the Scientific and Medical Network, the Commission has produced a comprehensive report on the impact of materialism on science, written by Harald Walach with input from 90 advisers in 30 universities.

Full Report Layman's Guide Join

The Galileo Commission report arrives in a critical and unprecedented moment in our history, where the need for a qualitative change in science has never been so apparent and pressing.

– Dr Vasileios Basios, University of Brussels

How To Revolutionise the Materialist Paradigm

Saturday 15 May • 4:00-7:00 PM (BST)

The panel will address the following questions:
  • What was your personal experience of transformation from the materialist paradigm to the consciousness paradigm, including the most influential books and mentors?
  • Imagine the paradigm has shifted. How did it happen and how is our world different?
  • What is the strongest and most persuasive evidence that the materialist paradigm is limited and harmful?
  • What philosophical assumptions that underpin the materialist paradigm need to be challenged?
  • What are models of the relationship between brain and consciousness, including Quantum Mechanics, i.e. ideas of space and time. Discuss the idealist view vs. the dual aspect approach.
  • What are the most influential effective tactics, organizations, social media, and more to inform the public?

This is a joint event hosted by The Galileo Commission, Scientific and Medical Network, Academy for the Advancement of Postmaterialist Sciences (AAPS), Institute of Noetic Sciences and Eternea.

View Details

Submit Your Essay for a Chance to Win

Essays should address evidence and arguments relating to consciousness beyond the brain and should be between 2,000 and 3,000 words, submitted as a word document.

Entrants are expected to study the Galileo Commission Main and Summary Reports as points of departure. The three volumes edited by Professor Ed Kelly of the University of Virginia – Irreducible Mind, Beyond Physicalism and Consciousness Unbound – are highly recommended.

We welcome submissions from undergraduates under the age of 23 on the closing date. Closing date is midnight BST on September 15, 2021.

  • First prize: £500
  • Second prize: £300
  • Third prizes: £100 each

The winning essay will be published in Paradigm Explorer, the journal of the Scientific and Medical Network, and the prize winners will be offered free passes to the 2021 online Beyond the Brain conference from November 5-7.

The Oxford Handbook of Psychology and Spirituality

THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF PSYCHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY

Edited by Lisa J Miller
Oxford, 2012, 634 pp., £52, p/b – ISBN 978-0-19-935734-5

This is a landmark volume, especially given the fact that it has been published by one of the world’s leading university presses. It forms part of the Oxford Library of Psychology, a series designed to review major sub-disciplines with breadth, comprehensiveness and exemplary scholarship; it also combines a searchable online facility. Significantly, though, only two of over 60 contributors from outside the United States.

In her introduction, Lisa Miller remarks that the handbook is at the cutting edge of an expanded psychology that directly addresses the broadened set of ontological assumptions and a view that spirituality is fundamental to the human constitution. In one sense, it continues the work of William James after a long diversion by taking the human mind as part and parcel of a living spiritual reality, which leads to an expansion of psychology ‘by a Copernican magnitude’ in the direction of postmaterialism, ‘a science beyond the limitations of exclusive ontological materialism and mechanism.’ This takes consciousness as fundamental and the fabric of reality.

The Flip book cover

THE FLIP

Jeffrey J. Kripal
Bellevue Literary Press, 2019, 239 pp., $19.99, p/b – ISBN 978-1-942658-52-8

Jeffrey Kripal is Professor of Philosophy and Religious Thought at Rice University and chairs the board of the Esalen Institute. He gave two brilliant and lucid talks at the science of consciousness meeting in Interlaken in June, and this superb book fully reflects these qualities. The flip of the title refers to epiphanies of mind that transform the outlook of the experiencer in the direction of holding consciousness rather than matter to be primary. This has immense implications for the future of knowledge, as the book explains in detail, beginning with experiences currently regarded as impossible within the scientific framework, then looking at flipped scientists and philosophers, the relationship between consciousness and cosmos, how symbols mediate meaning, and at the future politics of knowledge.

I was struck by Tom McLeish quoting Charles Darwin’s son writing about a special quality leading him to make discoveries: ‘it was the power of never letting exceptions pass unnoticed.’ In the consciousness field, for exceptions read anomalies. Nomos is order so an anomaly is something that does not fit into the currently accepted framework of assumptions. Far from never letting exceptions pass unnoticed, the scientific establishment goes out of its way to ignore and suppress findings inconsistent with its basic philosophy, exerting social and professional peer pressure in order to keep people in line.

Originally published on Boing Boing, 26 October 2020

James Randi
James Randi Sgerbic [CC BY-SA]

Several years ago I was preparing a talk on the life of occult journeyer Madame H.P. Blavatsky (1831–1891) for the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City. Someone on Facebook asked sardonically: "Will James Randi be there?" My interlocutor was referencing the man known worldwide as a debunker of psychical and paranormal claims. (That my online critic was outspoken about his own religious beliefs posed no apparent irony for him.)

Last week marked the death at age 92 of James "The Amazing" Randi, a stage magician who became internationally famous as a skeptic — indeed Randi rebooted the term "skepticism" as a response to the boom in psychical claims and research in the post-Woodstock era. Today, thousands of journalists, bloggers and the occasional scientist call themselves skeptics in the mold set by Randi. Over the past decade, the investigator himself was heroized in documentaries, profiles, and, now, obituaries. A Guardian columnist eulogized him as the "prince of reason."

In this interview for KOSMOS magazine, Dr Pim van Lommel shares insights from his work on near-death experiences, the findings from his renowned 2001 Dutch study, and how these findings relate to consciousness and the brain. Finally, Pim reflects that after 30 years of investigation into near-death experiences, not only has his own perspective on life changed, but his views on science have evolved too.

The future of science is that we need to change the definition of science because nowadays there is no subjective experience included so the first person recount is just called an anecdote. The essence of who we are is what we feel and what we think, and we cannot prove or objectify or measure or reproduce or falsify the content of our consciousness.
- Dr Pim van Lommel

Bernard Carr, PhD, is emeritus professor of mathematics and astronomy at Queen Mary University of London. He is coauthor of the book Quantum Black Holes and he is also editor of the anthology Universe or Multiverse? He is a past-president of the Society for Psychical Research and is also currently president of the Scientific and Medical Network.

Here he maintains that science is continually evolving. He draws upon examples from cosmology and black holes to make this point. He also reflects on his relationship with Stephen Hawking who was his faculty advisor and mentor. He suggests that science will not be complete until it can incorporate both mind and spirit.

New Thinking Allowed host, Jeffrey Mishlove, PhD, is author of The Roots of Consciousness, Psi Development Systems, and The PK Man. Between 1986 and 2002 he hosted and co-produced the original Thinking Allowed public television series. He is the recipient of the only doctoral diploma in parapsychology ever awarded by an accredited university (University of California, Berkeley, 1980).

In the philosophy of science, reductionism is commonly equated with the idea that all sciences are reducible to physics, in other words that all phenomena can be explained in terms of physical matter and forces. Human experience can be reduced to the activation of neurons in the brain. Life can be reduced to the chemical reactions of molecules.

To some it is "an attractive theory that is getting ever closer to reality". To those of us in the post-materialist movement, reductionism is the ugly stepchild of materialism. But why? What's wrong with simplifying nature to its lowest common denominators?

To answer that question, The Kurt Gödel Circle of Friends in Berlin, with the support of the University of Wuppertal, created the Kurt Gödel Prize, with a cash purse of 15,000 Euros for the best three essays. And the winners are...

... by restricting our attention to just the physical level, we lose sight of the very phenomenon we were studying. It disintegrates under our very eyes.

– Jesse Mulder

The Kurt Gödel Prize University of Wuppertal

The dominant explanations for the origins of language are inadequate for the very reason that they are essentially utilitarian and materialistic. It would be better to assume what language itself tells us. It is innately meaningful because its poetry enables us to perceive deeper structures of reality.

Do words "emerge from the cosmos, expressing its soul" or is language merely a utilitarian evolution from the grunts and hoots of our primate forebears? In The say of the land   Dr Mark Vernon argues for the Romantic theory of the origin of language, with support from Tolkien's fellow Inkling Owen Barfield, poet Simon Armitage and English palaeobiologist Simon Conway Morris.

In a world flooded with biased science, fake news, social engineering, predatory marketing, manipulative facebook memes and the like, our ability to make sense of things is increasingly overwhelmed. Words do as much harm as good, in the search for truth. If, however, words have soul as Mark Vernon suggests, perhaps a closer alignment between our material perceptions of reality and their implicit meanings will help us find the signal of truth within the fog of lies and manipulations.

Dr Mark Vernon is a practicing psychotherapist with a PhD in ancient Greek philosophy, and other degrees in physics and in theology. A former Anglican priest, his latest book is A Secret History of Christianity: Jesus, the Last Inkling and the Evolution of Consciousness. He writes for radio, newspapers and magazines and is co-host of the long-running podcast the Sheldrake – Vernon Dialogues.

The say of the land Mark's Website

If you've published a breakthrough in the field of biomedicine sometime in the last 9 years, you could win a whopping €300,000 from the BIAL Foundation. In addition to their regular grants for research, every two years the foundation selects one lucky team of scientists for this special recognition. For details go to Bial.com.

The Award will focus on one work published from 1 January 2010 onward that can be identified as representing a breakthrough. The Award is presented for the first time in 2019 and proposals must be submitted by 30 June 2019.

Only works nominated by the Voting members of the Jury, the members of the Scientific Board of the BIAL Foundation, previous BIAL award winners and Scientific Societies may be considered candidates for this Award.

Since 1994 the BIAL Foundation has supported 694 projects involving some 1500 researchers from 25 countries, resulting in the publication of 1260 articles and abstracts in indexed journals. The current repository of scientific activity supported by the BIAL Foundation is fully searchable through their database of project documents.

Find Out More on Bial.com Proposal Form and Regulations

The Templeton World Charity Foundation - which is separate from the regular Templeton Foundation - has a truly ambitious consciousness project. They've created a complex, six stage procedure for grant development, and don't accept unsolicited proposals (outside open calls for their target initiatives). Experiments involving psi would certainly be relevant to their intention to investigate, and decide between, rival theories of consciousness. Having significantly funded nearly 100 projects with large universities, small colleges, nonprofits and private companies, they have a real chance of moving the whole field forwards.

We aim to provide scientific breakthroughs and practical tools relating to the search for meaning, purpose, and truth.

Using a variety of funding, networking and outreach mechanisms, we will support targeted scientific experiments to investigate different theories of consciousness.

Templeton World Charity Foundation FAQ Projects

PSI Encyclopedia logo

The fledgling Psi Encyclopedia, edited by Robert McLuhan, is quick becoming the must-have alternative to the skewed and backwards notions so often encountered on Wikipedia. Created by the Society for Psychical Research in London, largely thanks to the generosity of the late Nigel Buckmaster, the site already covers many relevant subjects with articles crafted by top scientists in parapsychology, university professors, and professional authors.

As more of the shenanigans at play on Wikipedia have come to light, many in our community have keenly felt the need for a more rational and honest treatment of the subjects we care about. Whether it's whole topics like telepathy or near death experience, or researchers like Dean Radin or Rupert Sheldrake, pages on the popular wiki are routinely befouled with dismissive, denigrating language, misleading half-truths and outright falsehoods – on purpose and with malice – by determined and organized skeptics, some of whom have openly proclaimed their aims to control the narrative. With Google practically shoving Wikipedia in our faces, one can only guess the extent to which such articles have damaged public perception.

That is why, out of the gate, Psi Encyclopedia is a welcome endeavor. As more articles are added, and more people find the site, we can hope that Google's algorithm will shift, even if only a little, to reveal this invaluable resource to the world at large. Against the wicked Goliath such hopes may seem naive, but who knows, with courage and skill this David may yet prevail. With 300 articles, 50 expert authors and over a million words, the sling is definitely loaded. Anyone who cares about opening science to the joys of psi are encouraged to hit those pages hard and spread the news.

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